Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

In our implementation of confidence-based learning we classify each test taker into one of four categories of confidence accuracy: Green  -- this is the goal state. The employee is both knowledgeable and confident. Yellow – the employee is knowledgeable, but is not confident in his/her knowledge Orange – the employee is neither knowledgeable nor confident. … Continue reading Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

What is Subscription Learning — by Dr. Will Thalheimer

In my last blog post I argued that for microlearning to be effective the individual learning nuggets must be embedded within a larger learning strategy. In Intela, we call this larger strategy "Learning Subscriptions." After I wrote the post I came across an article written in 2014 by Dr. Will Thalheimer (www.work-learning.com) making a similar … Continue reading What is Subscription Learning — by Dr. Will Thalheimer

Making Microlearning Effective Using Learning Subscriptions

Last month I attended a life sciences learning conference. By far, the most discussed topic was microlearning. Everyone – learners, trainers, management – has jumped on the microlearning bandwagon. We have decided, en masse, that our learners will learn best when they are presented with their learning in short chunks. Vendors, of course, are no … Continue reading Making Microlearning Effective Using Learning Subscriptions

Answering Questions Out Loud Helps Your Learners to Remember

I recently came across an interesting study about the value of answering questions out loud. Victor Boucher of the University of Montreal tested student’s ability to memorize lists of words under four conditions. First, the students studied a list of words on a computer. He then divided the students into four groups and had each … Continue reading Answering Questions Out Loud Helps Your Learners to Remember

What Do We Remember Best? What We Learn First? What We Learn Last? Both? Neither?

Any of our readers who have studied education in college or graduate school may be familiar with the “primacy and recency” effect. This effect was first detected by our old friend Hermann Ebbinghaus who is, of course, most famous for his well-known forgetting curve. Ebbinghaus noticed that in a test of free recall of a … Continue reading What Do We Remember Best? What We Learn First? What We Learn Last? Both? Neither?