Using Microlearning to Ensure Long Term Mastery

In our past two posts we examined strategies for using microlearning for (a) delivering new content and (b) creating a sustainment learning strategy. This week we will consider how to use microlearning in the case where there is a large learning event and the goal is to achieve and sustain mastery. Returning to the classic … Continue reading Using Microlearning to Ensure Long Term Mastery

Why Are You Quizzing Me on What I Already Know?

Intela has a variety of evidence-based Microactivities that improve and sustain learning. One of the more popular activities is the Learning Sprint. A Learning Sprint is a flashcard-like exercise in which learners are required to answer questions from an item pool over a period of several days or weeks (exact scheduling can be set by … Continue reading Why Are You Quizzing Me on What I Already Know?

You Have a Test. Have You Studied? Good. Are You Confident? Not So Fast.

Last week we showed the results of a survey that provided evidence that learners overwhelmingly choose to study for an exam by re-reading the course material, to the exclusion of other more effective study methods. But what about confidence? Who is more confident: learners who restudy or learners who take practice tests?  And how does … Continue reading You Have a Test. Have You Studied? Good. Are You Confident? Not So Fast.

The Benefits of No Stakes Quizzing

Large numbers of studies have demonstrated the benefits of repeated testing. Requiring learners to retrieve and process previously learned information reinforces what they know and strengthens the neural connections, leading to long term retention. Most of these studies use classic experimental design. They split a learning group in two: One group studies in the normal … Continue reading The Benefits of No Stakes Quizzing

Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

In our implementation of confidence-based learning we classify each test taker into one of four categories of confidence accuracy: Green  -- this is the goal state. The employee is both knowledgeable and confident. Yellow – the employee is knowledgeable, but is not confident in his/her knowledge Orange – the employee is neither knowledgeable nor confident. … Continue reading Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

How Good Are Your Test Questions? And How Do You Know?

I’ve written and reviewed tens of thousands of test questions. To state the obvious to anyone who has ever done it: Writing good test questions is difficult. It’s the reason that serious testing organizations, like those that produce the SATs and the ACTs, spend millions of dollars creating quality questions. Those of us who work … Continue reading How Good Are Your Test Questions? And How Do You Know?

How Intela Helps You Detect Test Collusion (Part One)

For trainers who do remote, unproctored, testing (e.g. testing a distributed sales force) one nagging question is always: “Are my learners cheating?” Usually followed by the question: “If they are, can I tell?” The answers are (in order): maybe and maybe. It turns out there are three ways to detect cheating: one pretty simple, which … Continue reading How Intela Helps You Detect Test Collusion (Part One)

What Most Trainers Get Wrong About Confidence-Based Testing (And How Intela Gets It Right)

Recently, we announced the addition of confidence-based testing to Intela’s growing list of learning activities. So, what is the purpose of confidence-based testing? Its purpose is NOT to make learners more confident, as many people may think (and some products claim to do). Its purpose is to make learners appropriately confident. Confidence is a personality attribute. By … Continue reading What Most Trainers Get Wrong About Confidence-Based Testing (And How Intela Gets It Right)