Learning Myth #5: People Process Visual Information 60,000 Times Faster Than Text

If you have been following our series on learning myths you know that some “myths” are not really myths but are exaggerations or vendor hype grounded on some level of evidence. When I first saw this claim a few years ago the dial on my myth detector flew off the scale.  Surely no one actually … Continue reading Learning Myth #5: People Process Visual Information 60,000 Times Faster Than Text

Learning Myth #4 — Millennials Have the Attention Span of Goldfish

Does anyone seriously believe this? Unfortunately, yes. We’ve seen countless articles that begin with this premise, as if it were a canonical fact. If we are going to talk about attention span we first need to define what it is. (It’s interesting that none of the aforementioned articles that use the “goldfish” statistic ever actually … Continue reading Learning Myth #4 — Millennials Have the Attention Span of Goldfish

Learning Myth #3: Overhyping and Misapplying Microlearning

Some Q&A about microlearning: Q: Is microlearning a myth? A: No. Q: Is it being hyped by everyone in the learning community? A: Definitely. Q: Is it being overhyped by many in the learning community? A: For sure. Q: Is it being applied effectively to maximize learning and learning retention? A: Often, no. What Problems … Continue reading Learning Myth #3: Overhyping and Misapplying Microlearning

Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

In our implementation of confidence-based learning we classify each test taker into one of four categories of confidence accuracy: Green  -- this is the goal state. The employee is both knowledgeable and confident. Yellow – the employee is knowledgeable, but is not confident in his/her knowledge Orange – the employee is neither knowledgeable nor confident. … Continue reading Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

Answering Questions Out Loud Helps Your Learners to Remember

I recently came across an interesting study about the value of answering questions out loud. Victor Boucher of the University of Montreal tested student’s ability to memorize lists of words under four conditions. First, the students studied a list of words on a computer. He then divided the students into four groups and had each … Continue reading Answering Questions Out Loud Helps Your Learners to Remember