Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

In our implementation of confidence-based learning we classify each test taker into one of four categories of confidence accuracy: Green  -- this is the goal state. The employee is both knowledgeable and confident. Yellow – the employee is knowledgeable, but is not confident in his/her knowledge Orange – the employee is neither knowledgeable nor confident. … Continue reading Low Competence/ High Confidence: There’s a Name for That

Answering Questions Out Loud Helps Your Learners to Remember

I recently came across an interesting study about the value of answering questions out loud. Victor Boucher of the University of Montreal tested student’s ability to memorize lists of words under four conditions. First, the students studied a list of words on a computer. He then divided the students into four groups and had each … Continue reading Answering Questions Out Loud Helps Your Learners to Remember

Active Learning Through the Ages (Literally)

Aristotle (philosopher), Thomas Edison (inventor) and Jean Piaget (cognitive psychologist) all had similar thoughts about learning. Can you see the common thread? Aristotle:  Exercise in repeatedly recalling a thing strengthens the memory. Edison:   A man will resort to almost any expedient to avoid the real labor of thinking. Piaget:  Thinking is interiorized action. Yes, they … Continue reading Active Learning Through the Ages (Literally)